Krita https://krita.org Digital Painting. Creative Freedom. Thu, 18 Jun 2020 08:26:29 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.4.2 Krita 4.3.0 Released https://krita.org/en/item/krita-4-3-0-released/ Thu, 18 Jun 2020 07:00:27 +0000 https://krita.org/?p=10692 Three months after the release of Krita 4.2.9, we’ve got a major new feature release for you: Krita 4.3.0! We’ve spent the past year not just fixing bugs, even though we fixed over a thousand issues, but have also been busy adding cool new stuff to play with. There’s a whole new set of brush […]

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Three months after the release of Krita 4.2.9, we’ve got a major new feature release for you: Krita 4.3.0! We’ve spent the past year not just fixing bugs, even though we fixed over a thousand issues, but have also been busy adding cool new stuff to play with.

There’s a whole new set of brush presets that evoke watercolor painting. There’s a color mode in the gradient map filter and a brand new palettize filter and a high pass filter. The scripting API has been extended. It’s now possible to adjust the opacity and lightness on colored brush tips separately. You can now create animated brush tips that select brush along multiple dimensions. We’ve made it possible to put the canvas area in a window of its own, so on a multi monitor setup, you can have all the controls on one monitor, and your images on the other. The color selector has had a big update. There’s a new snapshot docker that stores states of your image, and you can switch between those. There’s a brand new magnetic selection tool. Gradients can now be painting as spirals.

Watch Ramon Miranda’s introduction to Krita 4.3 and check out the release notes for all the details!

Download

Windows

If you’re using the portable zip files, just open the zip file in Explorer and drag the folder somewhere convenient, then double-click on the krita icon in the folder. This will not impact an installed version of Krita, though it will share your settings and custom resources with your regular installed version of Krita. For reporting crashes, also get the debug symbols folder.

Linux

(If, for some reason, Firefox thinks it needs to load this as text: to download, right-click on the link.)

OSX

Note: the gmic-qt is not available on OSX.

Android/ChromeOS Beta

This time, the Android releases are made from the release tarball, so there are translations. Despite being create from the stable 4.3.0 release, we consider Krita on ChromeOS and Android still beta. There are many things that don’t work and other things that are impossible without a real keyboard.

It is still not recommended to use these betas on phones, though they do install. This beta will also be available in the Google Play Store.

Source code

md5sum

For all downloads:

Support Krita

Krita is a free and open source project. Please consider supporting the project with donations or by buying training videos! With your support, we can keep the core team working on Krita full-time.

The post Krita 4.3.0 Released appeared first on Krita.

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Interview with Albert Weand https://krita.org/en/item/interview-with-albert-weand/ Mon, 15 Jun 2020 12:04:05 +0000 https://krita.org/?p=10668 Could you tell us something about yourself? I’m an illustrator from Panama. I use Krita to create digital art, but I also work with traditional tools. Do you paint professionally, as a hobby artist, or both? It started as a hobby. Many of my illustrations are created as personal projects. However, I do accept commissions […]

The post Interview with Albert Weand appeared first on Krita.

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Could you tell us something about yourself?

I’m an illustrator from Panama. I use Krita to create digital art, but I also work with traditional tools.

Do you paint professionally, as a hobby artist, or both?

It started as a hobby. Many of my illustrations are created as personal projects. However, I do accept commissions or do professional work, if the occasion arises.

What genre(s) do you work in?

I used to draw manga (comics). As a result, most of my work was done in grayscale. But I was always interested in digital illustration and painting. Nowadays, I’m starting to take inspiration from fantasy and nature. My work focuses on characters but I’m trying to work on backgrounds as well.

Whose work inspires you most — who are your role models as an artist?

Years ago, when I started drawing manga, my style was influenced by artists like Masakazu Katsura, Inio Asano or Kentaro Miura. With digital paintings, I’ve been trying to expand my influences with works from traditional artists such as Ted Nasmith, Alan Lee, Miles Johnston and some Pre-Raphaelite paintings as well. I think it’s important to contemplate and study the works of other artists, even if their genre or style is different from yours; they can teach you something valuable. David Revoy and Krenz Cushart have also been a great source of inspiration.

How and when did you get to try digital painting for the first time?

When I finished high school, my father gave me a drawing tablet. At first, I was reluctant to use it because it was quite difficult to learn the coordination between sight and hand movements. Also, I didn’t have any experience in painting at all. Slowly, I started to get better at it. Thanks to digital painting I was able to learn more about the use of color, light and composition.

What makes you choose digital over traditional painting?

It’s relatively faster to make changes to your artwork. It’s easier to manage your tools since you just need a decent computer and a drawing tablet. There are many tutorials available on the internet. Now, even though I like digital art, I’m also interested in traditional oil painting. I just need to get the materials and start working on it. Sometimes I also work with graphite and watercolors.

How did you find out about Krita?

A couple of years ago, I started to gain interest in GNU/Linux and even considered using it as my main OS. One of my priorities was to find a good painting application compatible with the system. I tried MyPaint and Gimp, but Krita was definitely the best option.

What was your first impression?

I really like the user interface, it’s very flexible. I like to keep things simple and just focus on the artwork. The shortcuts to navigate around the canvas are great, they feel very natural. There’s no need to change tools in order to zoom in, zoom out or move around the canvas. I also like the default brushes, they feel organic and the textures help to simulate real brushes in traditional painting.

What do you love about Krita?

The project is free and open source; not only programmers but also artists do their part to improve the software. The documentation and the tutorials on Krita’s youtube channel are very useful. Also, I really like the fact that the application focuses on painting.

What do you think needs improvement in Krita? Is there anything that really annoys you?

I’m quite happy with the application and it’s features. If I had to point something out for improvement, it would be the text tool.

What sets Krita apart from the other tools that you use?

Based on my experience, Krita is very intuitive and the brush engine allows a lot of customization. The LUT Management tool is great, it helps me working with values.

If you had to pick one favourite of all your work done in Krita so far, what would it be, and why?

Right now, I think my favorite work would be “Nest”.


In my first digital paintings, the brushwork was very clean and everything had to be well-defined. Now I’ve come to understand that it’s important to balance the level of details; some things can be suggested by shapes and colors. If the brushstrokes have the same size and texture, the image might look too uniform. That’s why I’ve been trying to use more brushes in my artworks. I think I did a decent job here, although there’s certainly room for improvement.

What techniques and brushes did you use in it?

I used the default brushes in the paint tag, especially the bristle brushes. The wet knife is very useful for shapes and blending.

Sometimes I use some David Revoy’s new brushes. Also, I like the effect and texture of Ramon Miranda’s watercolor brushes.

Where can people see more of your work?

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/albertweand
Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/albertweand
Artstation: https://www.artstation.com/aweand

Anything else you’d like to share?

Thanks to everyone involved in the creation and development of Krita. It’s my favorite software, I use it on a regular basis and I’m quite happy to be able to work with it.

The post Interview with Albert Weand appeared first on Krita.

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Second Beta for Krita 4.3.0 Released https://krita.org/en/item/second-beta-for-krita-4-3-0-released/ Mon, 01 Jun 2020 15:36:58 +0000 https://krita.org/?p=10640 This is the second beta release for Krita 4.3.0. It’s later than expected because our system for making release builds was temporarily unavailable. Since the first beta, the following issues have been addressed: Fix Color picking in freehand path and bezier curve tool (BUG:373037). Fix zooming after changing the image resolution (BUG:421797) Switch the stabilizer […]

The post Second Beta for Krita 4.3.0 Released appeared first on Krita.

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This is the second beta release for Krita 4.3.0. It’s later than expected because our system for making release builds was temporarily unavailable.

Since the first beta, the following issues have been addressed:

  • Fix Color picking in freehand path and bezier curve tool (BUG:373037).
  • Fix zooming after changing the image resolution (BUG:421797)
  • Switch the stabilizer to always use scalable distance (BUG:421314)
  • Make sure channel thumbnails are not inverted when working with CMYK images (BUG:421442)
  • Make it possible to use save incremental and incremental backup on files in folders that are named to look like incremental saves or backups (BUG:421792)
  • The Python API for handling Document and Node objects is now synchronous: you do not have to add extra waitForDone calls anymore. (BUG:401497)
  • On macOS, support for using modifier keys with canvas input actions has been improved ( BUG:372646, BUG:373299, BUG:391088)
  • Implement touch support for Wacom tablets. Patch by P. Varet — thanks! (BUG:421295)
  • Fix issues with files taking a long time to save (BUG:421584)
  • Make the placeholder text in the text shape shorter and translatable (BUG:421663)
  • Shift-click on a layer to see the layer in isolation doesn’t change the visibility state of all layers anymore
  • Animation frames outside the requested range are no longer rendered
  • Make the autosave recovery dialog clearer (BUG:420014)
  • Properly play animations and show onion skins when viewing layers in isolation (BUG:394199)
  • Fix the position of the text shape editor on Windows (BUG:419529)
  • Fix gamut mask rendering (BUG:421142)
  • Fix artefacts when rendering the marching ants outline for small or complex selections (BUG:407868, BUG:419240, BUG:413220)
  • The animation timeline now correctly highlights the current frame after loading a file (BUG:403854)
  • Correctly align the onion skin after cropping an image (BUG:419462)
  • Fix rendering animations with odd render dimensions (BUG:396128)
  • Set the default values for the split layer dialog to something sensible
  • Fix eraser mode to be reset when the same color is picked from the canvas (BUG:415476)
  • Fix the aspect ratio of layer and channel thumbnails
  • Show the unsqueezed text of a squeezed combobox as a tooltip (BUG:415117)
  • Add more translation context in several places
  • Fix selecting colors in the stroke selection dialog (BUG:411482)
  • Fix the memory management of documents created from Python (BUG:412740)

Also, Rafał Mikrut has submitted many fixes for issues with memory management and pointer access. Thanks!

Kiki among the waterlilies

The full release notes bring you all the details!

Please help improve Krita by testing this beta!

Download

Windows

If you’re using the portable zip files, just open the zip file in Explorer and drag the folder somewhere convenient, then double-click on the krita icon in the folder. This will not impact an installed version of Krita, though it will share your settings and custom resources with your regular installed version of Krita. For reporting crashes, also get the debug symbols folder.

Linux

(If, for some reason, Firefox thinks it needs to load this as text: to download, right-click on the link.)

OSX

Note: the gmic-qt is not available on OSX.

Android

The Android builds were made from git, not the release tarball, so they don’t have translations. The beta is labeled 4.3.0-beta1 but actually contains all the fixes for beta 2, except for the commit that changed the version number.

This version of Krita for Android can load .kra files from Google Drive folders on ChromeOS, has fixes for problems with the menubar on some Samsung devices and has Samsung Air gestures integrated.

It is still not recommended to use these betas on phones, though they do install. This beta will also be available in the Google Play Store.

Source code

md5sum

For all downloads:

Support Krita

Krita is a free and open source project. Please consider supporting the project with donations or by buying training videos! With your support, we can keep the core team working on Krita full-time.

The post Second Beta for Krita 4.3.0 Released appeared first on Krita.

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Interview with Clément Mona https://krita.org/en/item/interview-with-clement-mona/ Mon, 25 May 2020 09:31:57 +0000 https://krita.org/?p=10580 Could you tell us something about yourself? Hello, I am a 36-year-old freelance illustrator and concept artist based in Brittany, France. I have worked in the industry since 2007 and am now a freelancer. Do you paint professionally, as a hobby artist, or both? I paint professionally but it is important to me to also […]

The post Interview with Clément Mona appeared first on Krita.

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Could you tell us something about yourself?

Hello, I am a 36-year-old freelance illustrator and concept artist based in Brittany, France. I have worked in the industry since 2007 and am now a freelancer.

Do you paint professionally, as a hobby artist, or both?

I paint professionally but it is important to me to also make a lot of personal work in my spare time. It allows me to try new techniques and processes.

What genre(s) do you work in?

I love Science-Fiction and fantasy and anything relative to alternative worlds, and anything relative to legends, tales… I particularly love ghost stories and old castle ruins… I also love nature and I spend a lot of time in the forest, observing the wildlife.

Whose work inspires you most — who are your role models as an artist?

I have a lot of influences and artists I admire like Thomas Scholes for his deep and colorful architectures, Piotr Jabłoński for his subtle shape language and textures with mysterious moods, Richard Wright for his mastery of composition and color, Andrey Surnov for his very original way of rendering contrasts, lights and surfaces, Karl Sisson for his refreshing way to create absolutely original concepts, and lot and lot of others, but also Dofresh for his mastery of composition and colors, and the way he creates organic shapes in his mech designs. Also, there is often a subtle social dimension on his thematics.

How and when did you get to try digital painting for the first time?

I actually painted on a computer for the first time in the 90s with a program called Canvas on my very old Atari ST… I made absolutely ugly artworks at this time.

What makes you choose digital over traditional painting?

I actually do both but for professional work it is much easier to go digital, because you can do retakes and deliver your work much more easily.

How did you find out about Krita?

I wanted to try someting different and a friend of mine showed me Krita in 2017.

What was your first impression?

I loved how intuitive Krita is, I handled the program very fast, more over my Wacom tablet worked perfectly on it, and that was not the case with oher applications at this time.

What do you love about Krita?

I love how fast I can paint with Krita. Also, the brush customisation is very nice and complete.

What do you think needs improvement in Krita? Is there anything that really annoys you?

I want to emphasize the fact that Krita is much more stable in 2020 than in 2017, the crashes are very rare now, even with 8k files. (I love to work with very high definition files in order to print my work in the future.)

The main thing I would like to see improved is the fluidity of the brushes. It is actually decent, but can be improved.

What sets Krita apart from the other tools that you use?

It is a complete and reliable solution for digital painting, almost it is very light.

If you had to pick one favourite of all your work done in Krita so far, what would it be, and why?

My favorite work so far is probably “Refugees” I learned a lot doing this one, I have tried to make a crowd with minimal details, I tried to find the essence of what makes a crowd looks like a crowd.

What techniques and brushes did you use in it?

I made my own brush with the fantastic brush engine that mimics a kind of knife brush and made the basis for the crowd with very loose brush strokes.

I tested a lot of brushes, and Wet_Bristle_Rough was used to refine details of the crowd. I like its oil paint feeling.

Where can people see more of your work?

You can see my work mainly on Artstation, Twitter and Instagram:

https://www.artstation.com/afanissiev
https://twitter.com/afanissief
https://www.instagram.com/clement.mona.wildlife/

Anything else you’d like to share?

I would like to encourage young artists not to give up, the road is long to learn how to draw, it is a long term project. If you train regularly, if you spend 10 minutes every day at drawing, I garantee you will be able to draw in the long term.

 

The post Interview with Clément Mona appeared first on Krita.

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First Krita Beta for Android and ChromeOS in Play Store https://krita.org/en/item/first-krita-beta-for-android-and-chromeos-in-play-store/ Sat, 23 May 2020 09:24:01 +0000 https://krita.org/?p=10546 Thanks to the hard work of Sharaf Zaman, Krita is now available in the Google Play Store for Android tablets and Chromebooks (not for Android phones). This beta, based on Krita 4.2.9, is the full desktop version of Krita, so it doesn’t have a special touch user interface. But it’s there, and you can play […]

The post First Krita Beta for Android and ChromeOS in Play Store appeared first on Krita.

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Thanks to the hard work of Sharaf Zaman, Krita is now available in the Google Play Store for Android tablets and Chromebooks (not for Android phones).

This beta, based on Krita 4.2.9, is the full desktop version of Krita, so it doesn’t have a special touch user interface. But it’s there, and you can play with it.

Unlike the Windows and Steam store, we don’t ask for money for Krita in the store, since it’s the only way people can install Krita on those devices, but you can buy a supporter badge from within Krita to support development.

Install

Notes

  • Supports: Android tablets & Chromebooks (Android versions supported: Android 6 (Marshmallow) and up).
  • Currently not compatible with: Android phones.
  • If you have installed one of Sharaf’s builds or a build you’ve signed yourself, you need to uninstall that first, for all users!

Krita on the Play Store

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Interview with Jefferson Nascimento https://krita.org/en/item/interview-with-jefferson-nascimento/ Mon, 11 May 2020 10:14:18 +0000 https://krita.org/?p=10437 Could you tell us something about yourself? I’m Jeff, a brazilian animator and character designer (sometimes illustrator). I have a bachelor’s degree in biology and cinema, the latter one being completed in 2019, specialized in animation. Do you paint professionally, as a hobby artist, or both? Both, it’s a bit odd, you know, your profession […]

The post Interview with Jefferson Nascimento appeared first on Krita.

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Could you tell us something about yourself?

I’m Jeff, a brazilian animator and character designer (sometimes illustrator). I have a bachelor’s degree in biology and cinema, the latter one being completed in 2019, specialized in animation.

Do you paint professionally, as a hobby artist, or both?

Both, it’s a bit odd, you know, your profession and hobby all mixed together, I’m trying to get back to playing video games and trying to read more non-related things. It’s good to get a bit out of the bubble.

What genre(s) do you work in?

I love to draw animals and make creatures. But recently I’m drawing a lot of people to get better at it, normally some fantasy or superhero themes in urban context.

Whose work inspires you most — who are your role models as an artist?

Hmm, the first to come to mind is Chuck Jones, it was the first name I recognized again and again in cartoons and as a child I had thoughts like “he must be the most amazing guy” And after reading his book Chuck Amuck and The Noble Approach by Maurice Noble it turned out to be true.

How and when did you get to try digital painting for the first time?

My first experience was with an illustrator on a very bad “CGI” course. But what I liked the most was the flash. In this course I received classes in almost the entire suite of Adobe and Maya, all in 2007. In 2009 I went to college, on the biology course, and stopped studying animation and drawing. After 3 years of biology I returned to digital art with pixel art and vectors in inkscape and aseprite.

What makes you choose digital over traditional painting?

In the beginning it was fear, with pixel art and vectors I had all the control. After that was because of animation, doing 2d animation on paper needs a huge setup and you know what Uncle Ben said, “with big setups comes a big bill to pay”. Nowdays I still do animation, but I don’t make a choice, I do what each project needs, recently I directed a stop-motion short because it was the right language for the message.

How did you find out about Krita?

I use Linux as a main OS from time to time, in 2016 I was searching open source alternatives for drawing, back in the days I was using MyPaint, I never liked Gimp for drawing, so I used an “alternative” copy of other software, but not Photoshop, I never liked to draw with Photoshop. Then I found this piece of software that looked like a good alternative and tried. It fit all my expectations.

What was your first impression?

Wow, it’s like Photoshop, hey, the right click what…

What do you love about Krita?

Tough one. Can I say David Revoy? or Wolthera? I learned so much from those two. Ok, enough kidding, I love the layer management. I don’t have to use the mouse to quickly rename and organize everything, I worked in an office where I had to use Photoshop, and man, oh man, I suddenly realized why every artist ever who uses Photoshop doesn’t rename layers, it’s just terrible.

What do you think needs improvement in Krita? Is there anything that really annoys you?

The Windows port, it’s just slow. I had to get back to Windows a year ago and with a better configuration it’s slower than the Linux version. It was the most difficult thing I had to cope with when trying to make some friends get into krita, it’s like flipping a coin, sometimes it works, sometimes not.

What sets Krita apart from the other tools that you use?

The organization of the tools, whenever I’m teaching about Krita, I had the time to “get into the mindset”, you don’t need a tool for everything, open a dock and a tool has many ways.

If you had to pick one favourite of all your work done in Krita so far, what would it be, and why?

My static favourite is the version of the lofi girl I did for a twitter thread. I used all my knowledge of art and krita to make it: filter layers, g’mic, collage, masks, textures, brushes et cetera.

My animated favourite is a short animation about coffee making where I made a texture with used coffee filters.

Café from Jefferson Nascimento on Vimeo.

What techniques and brushes did you use in it?

I try to be simple. I use some layers, but not many and sometimes I use photobashing because I like to get the mixing of cartoons and photos. As for brushes, I love the recent pack of David Revoy. I like the rough ones, tons of texture in my line.

Where can people see more of your work?

Twitter: @jeff_lhama
Instagram: @jeff_lhama
Vimeo: jeffanimation
Behance: jeffsn

Anything else you’d like to share?

I have this story where I managed to install Krita, Blender and OpenToonz on all computers at the college. My college is UFPEL (Federal University of Pelotas), a public institution, there we have a lot of freedom to use the tool you want, for good and for bad at the same time. In my first semester, I made a small pen drive with all the necessary software; whenever we had some work to do in the classroom, I would turn on the unit and use one of them. Some teachers started asking me from time to time what I was doing and I explained all the advantages. In my second semester we had a great job, making a 2D animation short. At that point there was the addition of the animation tools to Krita and the launch of OpenToonz and I convinced my team to use them, because I was using Linux and I have no option of using flash, Toonboom or even Photoshop at home; therefore, for compatibility reasons, we had to work with these tools. At the moment, I already had a lot of knowledge about the tools, I had a YouTube channel about OpenToonz and Krita. So it was easy to get the team on the boat. After a while, one of the team colleagues asked the professor responsible for the software to install Krita and OpenToonz, because it would be easier to work on any computer. The professor came to me and we installed Krita, OpenToonz and Blender in two laboratories. After the end of the semester, at the beginning of the third, I was surprised, all the computers got Krita, OpenToonz and Blender. And I received invitations to hold workshops on the use of Krita and OpenToonz. Today, most of the short frame-by-frame animations made here are powered by Krita. (And a secret, I helped to change the 3d workflow from Max to Blender too)

The post Interview with Jefferson Nascimento appeared first on Krita.

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Presenting Our Google Summer of Code Students! https://krita.org/en/item/presenting-our-google-summer-of-code-students/ Tue, 05 May 2020 14:28:46 +0000 https://krita.org/?p=10264 It’s that time of the year again! Google has published the names of the students who will be allowed to work on open source of free software, and who will receive a stipend from Google. And like last year, this year we are mentoring four students! Sharaf Zaman is a veteran from last year, when […]

The post Presenting Our Google Summer of Code Students! appeared first on Krita.

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It’s that time of the year again! Google has published the names of the students who will be allowed to work on open source of free software, and who will receive a stipend from Google. And like last year, this year we are mentoring four students!

Sharaf Zaman is a veteran from last year, when he ported Krita to Android. In fact, over the past couple of weeks he’s been busy putting Krita in the Google Play Store, in the beta track. Apart from some administrative worries, we’re ready to publish that! This year, he will implement a new kind of gradients: mesh gradients. Here is his project proposal. Mesh gradients were first implemented in Inkscape, and now we’re going for a second, independent implementation. Here’s a video of Inkscape’s Mesh Gradients:

Leonardo Segovia will be adding dynamic fill layers, using SeExpr. Here is his project proposal. SeExpr is a language developed by Disney: an embeddable, arithmetic expression language that enables flexible artistic control and customization in creating computer graphics images. Example uses include procedural geometry synthesis, image synthesis, simulation control, crowd animation, and geometry deformation.” After integrating this language in Krita, it will become possible to script fill layers, meaning everyone can create new types of fill layers without having to know C++.

Saurabh Kumar is going to work on a storyboard feature for Krita: a way to easily create connected images, and, more importantly, to visualize them, order them and annotate the images. The project also includes exporting the finished storyboards as PDF. His project plan is here.

Ashwin Dhakaita will be integrating the MyPaint brush library in Krita as a new brush engine. Once upon a time Krita did have a MyPaint brush engine, but the MyPaint developers dropped their existing integration support and created a new library. But these days many more applications use the mypaint brush library, meaning that integrating it is much safer. Here is his project proposal.

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First Beta of Krita 4.3.0 Released https://krita.org/en/item/first-beta-of-krita-4-3-0-released/ Mon, 04 May 2020 12:00:33 +0000 https://krita.org/?p=10248 Krita 4.3.0 will be the next full feature release of Krita. We’ve worked for a year on this new version of Krita, focusing especially on stability and performance. Many tool, like freehand painting and selections are faster than ever. And there is a bunch of fun new features, as well, many contributed by volunteers from […]

The post First Beta of Krita 4.3.0 Released appeared first on Krita.

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Krita 4.3.0 will be the next full feature release of Krita. We’ve worked for a year on this new version of Krita, focusing especially on stability and performance. Many tool, like freehand painting and selections are faster than ever. And there is a bunch of fun new features, as well, many contributed by volunteers from all over the world.

Kiki among the waterlilies

The full release notes bring you all the details!

Please help improve Krita by testing this beta!

Download

Windows

If you’re using the portable zip files, just open the zip file in Explorer and drag the folder somewhere convenient, then double-click on the krita icon in the folder. This will not impact an installed version of Krita, though it will share your settings and custom resources with your regular installed version of Krita. For reporting crashes, also get the debug symbols folder.

Linux

(If, for some reason, Firefox thinks it needs to load this as text: to download, right-click on the link.)

OSX

Note: the gmic-qt is not available on OSX.

Source code

md5sum

For all downloads:

Support Krita

Krita is a free and open source project. Please consider supporting the project with donations or by buying training videos! With your support, we can keep the core team working on Krita full-time.

The post First Beta of Krita 4.3.0 Released appeared first on Krita.

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Interview with Joshua Grier https://krita.org/en/item/interview-with-joshua-grier/ Mon, 27 Apr 2020 07:45:30 +0000 https://krita.org/?p=10209 Could you tell us something about yourself? I’m Josh, and I love design. There’s nothing better than taking people’s stories, thoughts, feelings, wants and needs and responding to them in practical ways. Do you paint professionally, as a hobby artist, or both? As my full time job I’m a Concept Artist in the video game […]

The post Interview with Joshua Grier appeared first on Krita.

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Could you tell us something about yourself?

I’m Josh, and I love design. There’s nothing better than taking people’s stories, thoughts, feelings, wants and needs and responding to them in practical ways.

Do you paint professionally, as a hobby artist, or both?

As my full time job I’m a Concept Artist in the video game industry, I spend a lot of my free time practicing as well though.

What genre(s) do you work in?

Mostly on props, vehicles, toys, mechanical things and environments in my comfort zone. Generally whatever the job requires though in my day to day. Everything is interesting, and drawing is drawing whatever the subject or style.

Whose work inspires you most — who are your role models as an artist?

For a long while now it’s been Vaughan Ling, Sinix, Jake Parker and Scott Robertson. By extension though I’d say my friends and peers in the concept art community in general. And going back I have a thing for lithography. Love M.C. Escher and Gustave Dore.

How and when did you get to try digital painting for the first time?

Some time during primary school on a really old Corel tablet I got as a present haha. I tried doing some ‘Zoids’ fan art and it was a pretty brutal learning curve. I’m sure everyone has some anime fanart attempts deep in the archives!

What makes you choose digital over traditional painting?

Mostly efficiency as what I create for work needs to be done reasonably quick and needs to be flexible when it comes to making changes and rapidly iterating.

How did you find out about Krita?

I heard about it through some artists I follow. Sinix and Sycra have Youtube videos showcasing the software from a while back.

What was your first impression?

I found the brush engine stood out to me over competing programs. It felt and still feels far more intuitive and more well designed for art and design than other packages I’ve tried to use.

What do you love about Krita?

I love that Krita is accessible to all of the creative community, I love how versatile/customizable it is and how high quality it is and continues to be as it’s improved over the years!

What do you think needs improvement in Krita? Is there anything that really annoys you?

Most things have been fixed that bothered me, I’d say that some of the animation tools are a little frustrating sometimes when you’re working on something complex. Text tools also.

What sets Krita apart from the other tools that you use?

For me personally I’ve found the brush engine more forgiving than other pieces of software and through working with others I’ve gotten comfortable with creating my own presets and modifying them when I need specific tools. In most other software I just use whatever the default is haha.

If you had to pick one favourite of all your work done in Krita so far, what would it be, and why?

Ooh always a tough one haha. Of the recent work I’ve done in Krita that I can share I’d say the car thumbnails for my Masters project are my favourite. To me they represent breaking through to a level of confidence in my professional work I’d not experienced to that level previously.

What techniques and brushes did you use in it?

I follow a pretty traditional workflow a lot of the time. For that it was mostly a thick marker brush and a thin marker brush with 70-80% opacity and directional stroke turned on to work in and out of my shapes (erasing with the same brushes too to control values.) I’ve found this to nicely simulate the process of using markers and ink to draft up design ideas.

On my Instagram for smaller regular updates instagram.com/genericblackguy and on my artstation for my
portfolio at artstation.com/joshuagrier

Anything else you’d like to share?

Good luck in your art journeys and feel free to reach out, I’m always happy to interact with the wider community! Check out GD Quest’s Krita brush pack, I helped Nathan work on the updated brush pack (not paid or sponsored or anything I just find it useful) https://gumroad.com/gdquest

Oh and hopefully I can share some even cooler design work I’ve done and will continue to do in Krita in the near future soon, thanks!

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Interview with Philipp Urlich https://krita.org/en/item/interview-with-philipp-urlich/ Mon, 06 Apr 2020 09:57:46 +0000 https://krita.org/?p=10185 Could you tell us something about yourself? I’m from Switzerland and have studied art and graphic design in 90′. Do you paint professionally, as a hobby artist, or both? It’s a hobby but I’m happy to be able to do some commissions for an RPG book lately, and I got several projects to work on […]

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Could you tell us something about yourself?

I’m from Switzerland and have studied art and graphic design in 90′.

Do you paint professionally, as a hobby artist, or both?

It’s a hobby but I’m happy to be able to do some commissions for an RPG book lately, and I got several projects to work on in the near future.

What genre(s) do you work in?

My main focus currently are fantasy environments. But I also do character design and love to paint dragons.

Whose work inspires you most — who are your role models as an artist?

There’s many artists I’m inspired by. For example Bierstadt for his romantic landscape. Also all the Russian landscape artists like Schischkin and many more. Frank Frazetta and Möbius. Of course there’s so many other old master artists throughout the history I can’t list them all. I also admire the work of A. Rocha, who is a young artist that has a similar style. There’s so many awesome artists to get inspired by and thanks to the internet it’s easy to see their work.

How and when did you get to try digital painting for the first time?

I think it was in 1997, when I got my first Wacom Intuos2. I didn’t really get into it and had other interests at that time. In 2010 I picked it up again for some portraits I was doing videos of, but lost interest again. It’s only in Feb 2019 where I really started again more serious with a mission in mind.

What makes you choose digital over traditional painting?

The flexibility and being able to produce things not possible or very hard in traditional. I don’t have an atelier and the resources to paint traditionally.

How did you find out about Krita?

Since I was not keen on using Photoshop for painting (even though I worked for many years with Photoshop), I was looking for alternatives. Then I finally found Krita in 2018.

What was your first impression?

I was surprised, how many features and tools it had. The brush engines are very powerful and the UI seemed intuitive enough.

What do you love about Krita?

I love that it’s open source. It has many great tools for various tasks. The ability to create your own powerful brushes. I also love that you can do animations.

What do you think needs improvement in Krita? Is there anything that really annoys you?

Performance can always be improved and it’s a very important one. Though Krita has made some big leaps in that regard. I’m often working on greater resolutions with tons of layers, and it can get somewhat laggy depending on the amount of things you put in.

Stability. There’s some parts where Krita crashes sometimes when it comes to vector tools. Though it’s not its main focus, it’s still annoying when you want to experiment with things and it won’t let you.

What sets Krita apart from the other tools that you use?

It has a great community, not only the users but also the developers are awesome. I was able to chat with a developer (Wolthera) to talk about color management in Krita. The developers care and are putting lots of work into making it a better program.

There’s people like Ramon Miranda who puts a lot of effort into making top notch brushes and cares a lot about the community.

The software lets you do your work and doesn’t get in the way. Easy to use yet very powerful.

If you had to pick one favourite of all your work done in Krita sofar, what would it be, and why?

I think it has to be my latest painting to date. “The Source“. It was done completely live on stream over 3 days.

It’s heavily inspired by A. Bierstadt and I think I pushed myself a little further (like I try every time on a painting like this)

What techniques and brushes did you use in it?

This one is special as it was done with mainly only the default round brush opaque with size and opaque on pressure.

The technique is somehow comparable to painting in oil. I used a lot of layers while having the background shine through. I switch between painting and eraser a lot.

Where can people see more of your work?

https://artstation.com/somartist

Anything else you’d like to share?

I want to thank all the people that made Krita possible. You guys are awesome.

I like to tell other artists to try Krita. I hope to inspire other people to do artwork too.

Thank you!

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