Hi!

Ramon Miranda here! Let's talk about Krita brush sets. The default set is big, not huge... But certainly big enough so you can get lost easily if you don't spend a lot of time investigating. But if you dig deep enough, and explore the huge number of options, you'll find some real gems. So lets see what i have discovered about one type of brushes: the hairy brushes.

The Default Hairy Brush Set:

After a some thorough and productive testing time, I got to a point where I managed to get a predictable and stable performance out of the hairy brushes. the hairy brushes can be very fast when you tweak some values, and that makes them more interesting.

The current set is a very good starting point but I felt I could improve on it. Read on for what I did – and a sneak preview of the Muses Painting with Krita DVD (which is getting very close now!)

 

The Muses Hairy Brush Set:

For starters:
Let's change the painting mode from Wash to Build-up and link the opacity to the pressure curve sensor. Now we've got something that quite useful for expressive painting, but not for a realistic style.
Let's also improve the icons we use a bit. Check out http://community.kde.org/Krita/Brushes_Preset_Preview for ongoing to work to coordinate the icons for Krita preset packs!

Next: advanced options:

  • Anti-aliasing: I haven´t seen a significant negative impact on performance and the quality improves a bit at 100% zoom level, so I've turned this on for all brushes.

  • Most of them use Bristle options/Mouse Pressure. This parameter uses the speed of the brushtroke to increase the size. I found it interesting, because we can make more detailed things as we paint slower.

  • All of them use a bit of Shear parameter to avoid the “superstraight” effect on bristles

  • Also some of these new presets use the Ascension with a not common ramp. This ramp is useful to constrain the amount of degrees you can rotate your hand before the brush start to rotate and covers the Left and Right rotation. You only have to modify the corners points to make this behavior more sensitive.


Contents of the Hairy Brush Pack

Contents:There are 6 presets that can be clearly identified. I designed them to be usable not just with a tablet, but also with a mouse – and still keep most of the appearance of a brushtroke. The description is for generic use, don't limit yourself!

Hairy_Details: An easy to use detailing brush. You can see how the size changes if you go faster. Combined with different pressures and speed you get a lot of variety in your brushtrokes. Great to create edges and little details with slow speed.

Hairy_Large: To make backgrounds and cover large areas. It uses “ascension” to make it more versatile.

Hairy_Special_Blender: Not a common blender! It “paints”, but only with the color that is below the direct contact point of the stylus: it smears that color around using the opacity controlled by pressure. Sounds weird? Just give it a try!
The hairy special blender uses the “ascension” feature to make it more random and versatile. As you change the wrist angle we change the “grainy” direction so we can create “rare” patterns if we want. You'll need a tablet that support tilt to experience the feature, of course.
If you apply low pressure, you'll achieve a really nice kind of blending with a nice, soft grainy effect.

Hairy_Squared: This is a Squared Type brush. It can be use as a generic brush for mid size areas. And with not too much effects on parameters to make it controllable with a good predictable result like a classical bristle brush.

Hairy_Tapered: Creates a tapered brushtroke. You'll get the best results if you combine pressure with a fast, “gestured” stroke. Moving slowly makes it usable for details, like edges. Low pressure but fast movement is useful to cover mid size areas like a glazing with semi translucent brushtrokes.

Hairy_Texture: Creates a textured look – a bit like a sponge. The user can control this effect with bristle options/random offset. Be careful with this value. Bigger values can decrease performance – but still fun to experiment with.
You can modify the Density parameter on the Brush nib to make the “spider-web” look less visible. The “density” controls the amount of the brush visible parts. Another tweak: you can vary the “density” bar on the bristle options/density

How to install:

Download

The brushkit ZIP can be downloaded here.
The brush set is compatible with Krita 2.7 and the current 2.8 development branch.

License :  the brushkit itself and thumbnails is released under the WTFPL 2.0  ( compatible Public Domain and CC-0 ).

Install

Unzip the downloaded zip , and paste the files into your Krita user preference directory. On Linux, the Krita preferences are located here :  /home//.kde/share/apps/krita/paintoppresets

 

 

 

Muses: Painting with Krita DVD
Special pre-order price including shipping and V.A.T: €27.50

Krita's webshop is now officially open! This summer, Maria Far and Chinkal Nagpal have spent lots of time finding great artwork to make awesome products with -- and now there's lot of really cool swag in the shop! Of course, we couldn't have done it without the constant contributions and support from artists who love Krita: Andreas Raninger, Coyau, Elena Pollastri, Enrico Guarnieri, Jens Reuterberg, Mery Alison Thompson, Nayobe Millis, Namito, Phillip Koops, Stepan, Tago, Tepee and Yuri Fidelis.

 

Collage of products in Kritashop

 

 

 

Yesterday, David Revoy presented his new and 3rd brush kit for Krita. Thanks to him for his constant collaboration!
He has post a complete guide where you can find how to use, download and install it.
He has developed a consistent work, creating new thumbnails with standard backgrounds, composition and colors, with the goal to merge into the main version. So, don't be surprise if you find some of his brushes in Krita default brushes.

Enjoy it!

 

Hello readers, today we are sharing a short interview with Elena, from Italy, who is a Computer Engineer by profession and a painter by hobby. She is learning anatomy at present and she is loaded with an amazing spirit to learn more. She is also collaborating with us for the Krita Shop on zazzle. Click on "read more" to read the entire conversation with this amazing budding artist!

 


Hi Elena, Would you like to tell us something about yourself?

I'm not very good at painting, I'm learning anatomy but I prefer to publish only simple things since half good/half bad anatomy falls easily in the uncanny valley ^^'

 

That sounds great. We look forward to you sharing those works!

Now, how would you define the importance of painting in your daily life?

Painting is a big part of my life but is only a hobby, a "serious" hobby in the last 2 years.

 

When and how did you end up trying digital painting for the first time?

I was a preschooler and my father was kind enough to let me use his computer, a commodore 64 if I remember correctly.

 

What is it that makes you choose digital over traditional painting?

It's cheaper and less time consuming.

 

Short yet very precise! So, how did you first find out about open source communities? What is your opinion about them?

During the first year of university we used FreeBSD, the next year I began to use Ubuntu and frequent the Italian forum. My opinion about them is generally positive.

 

Have you worked for any FOSS project or contributed in some way?

I only did this brush set for MyPaint. http://browse.deviantart.com/art/Brushes-for-mypaint-281981370

 

How did you find out about Krita?

I watched this video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lyLPZDVdQiQ .

 

What was your first take on it?

After buying a new graphic tablet I decided to try it, unfortunately working with Krita was too much for my old laptop.

 

What do you love about Krita?

It's the right tool for what I want to do; the interface is functional and not distracting.

 

What do you think needs improvement in Krita? Also, anything that you hate?

Hate is such a strong word... Sometimes it's slow with big images and/or big brushes.

 

In your opinion, what sets Krita apart from the other tools that you use?

I mainly use Mypaint, I spend a big portion of my free time doodling with the pencil brushes but when I have a specific idea I prefer Krita; I make a lot of errors, making corrections in Krita is faster and for a final touch I love the color smudge brush with the smearing option. *_* I have never seen something similar in others open source programs.

 

If you had to pick one favorite of all your work done in Krita so far, what would it be? What brushes did you use?            

OK, I said "hate is a strong word" but I hate all of my works. XD I still don't have the technical skills to draw exactly what I want. Maybe I don't know what I really want to draw, maybe I shall always been unsatisfied. And that's good. :) I want to improve myself and be a better artist.

I don't have a favorite, above is the last work done with Krita. I used a lot of brushes for this, I still can't choose what is better for my paintings.

 

I appreciate your spirit Elena!
It was a pleasure interviewing you. Hope you enjoyed this talk as much as I did! :)

Thank you for this opportunity, and for your work. Even if art is only a hobby for me, after a day of working, it makes me happy to take some time and draw; some days a pencil is enough, sometimes I need something more. So... Thank you, again. :)

 

Pleasure is all ours. Hope Krita continues to be your friend while learning and later. :)

You can check out more of her artworks on deviant here.

 



Today we have for you an interview with Coyau, who is the artist who has collaborated with us with the funny artwork of the mouse, thanks to him! Enjoy the interview!

Hi Coyau, Do you paint professionally or as a hobby artist?
I paint mostly as a hobby artist, but I sometimes have to produce drawings or paintings professionally.

When and how did you end up trying digital painting for the first time?
I spend a few years doing traditional painting. And I tried digital painting, and I realized that I didn't have to wash my brushes and would not lose my pencils or my eraser any more, and I bought a small wacom tablet (more or less 10 years ago).

 

mouse_by_coyau-d5qwt9r

 

What is it that makes you choose digital over the traditional painting? or Do you still prefer traditional means, if so, why?
Each technique has its advantages. History and layers make digital painting easy to erase, and that's good if you want to try different things (it sometimes is difficult to stop trying and actually doing). Zooming is nice too (and dangerous at the same time). And I don't lose my eraser any more. Traditional painting is more direct, you see what you get, you feel what you do (the pencil on the paper…), there is a sense of timing that I like (the time for watercolor to dry, or not completely, or not at all…). And there is no damn settings.--Nice comment--.

How did you first find out about open source communities? What is your opinion about them?
I discovered open source through Wikipedia when I started contributing in 2005. I guess open source is nice when you can to code, other than that, well… I still would have to pay someone to do my coding if I wanted something done (I've tried asking nicely, it doesn't always work). And often, FOSS are done by developers with smart algorithms and a lot of goodwill, but no idea of what is using the software when you need a result and you don't have time to spend understanding what every setting means.
It's great, though, to have free software, without having to pay a licence or to crack anything.

Have you worked for any FOSS project or contributed in some way?
I use some, but I don't code, I don't understand software enough to do a bug report… I sometimes talk about it to people.

How did you find out about Krita?
I discovered Krita through David Revoy and his work on Tears of Steel for the Blender Foundation.

What was your first take on it?
I got lost in the brushes settings.

What do you love about Krita?
It is a painting software where there is more than just brushes. I like all the transformation tools, the rulers, etc., they make it easy to correct a drawing without erasing (I have been taught that erasing is bad).

What do you think needs improvement in Krita? Also, anything that you really hate?
I don't know, really. I could say that it needs hierarchy: few presets (like brushes) easy to find/use and to use and all the fine settings if you need them or if you want to refine your use of it.

In your opinion, what sets Krita apart from the other tools that you use?
The transformation tools, and the grids are really cool on one hand and on the other, the complexity of all the brush settings and the huge number of blend modes I will likely never use.

If you had to pick one favorite of all your work done in Krita so far, what would it be?
I've uploaded to DeviantART my favorites (what I didn't delete so far – I delete a lot).

What is it that you like about the mouse? What brushes did you use in it?
I've tried to do what I did on paper: kraft paper, “pencil_HB” (which works well), “Pencil_2B” (that looks more like black chalk), a little watercolor and white gouache for the highlights (unfortunately, I can't find the watercolor tool, so I've used white “pencil_HB” instead – go figure).
Maybe I should try brush kits…

Thanks Coyau for this interview! Here you can see more of his art :)

Hi to all!

Here we are again with new products in the webshop. Now we have for you pillows, t-shirts, laptop sleeves... and more!
This time we had the collaboration of Tago Franceschi, Coyau and Nayobe Millis (our youngest artist), thanks to all of them to allow us to make great stuff with their artworks! You can see all the products on the Kritashop.

Here are some photos of the new products, enjoy it and share your love for Krita!

Cute tote bag by Nayobe Millis!
Cute tote bag by Nayobe Millis!
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