Today we have for you an interview with Coyau, who is the artist who has collaborated with us with the funny artwork of the mouse, thanks to him! Enjoy the interview!

Hi Coyau, Do you paint professionally or as a hobby artist?
I paint mostly as a hobby artist, but I sometimes have to produce drawings or paintings professionally.

When and how did you end up trying digital painting for the first time?
I spend a few years doing traditional painting. And I tried digital painting, and I realized that I didn't have to wash my brushes and would not lose my pencils or my eraser any more, and I bought a small wacom tablet (more or less 10 years ago).

 

mouse_by_coyau-d5qwt9r

 

What is it that makes you choose digital over the traditional painting? or Do you still prefer traditional means, if so, why?
Each technique has its advantages. History and layers make digital painting easy to erase, and that's good if you want to try different things (it sometimes is difficult to stop trying and actually doing). Zooming is nice too (and dangerous at the same time). And I don't lose my eraser any more. Traditional painting is more direct, you see what you get, you feel what you do (the pencil on the paper…), there is a sense of timing that I like (the time for watercolor to dry, or not completely, or not at all…). And there is no damn settings.--Nice comment--.

How did you first find out about open source communities? What is your opinion about them?
I discovered open source through Wikipedia when I started contributing in 2005. I guess open source is nice when you can to code, other than that, well… I still would have to pay someone to do my coding if I wanted something done (I've tried asking nicely, it doesn't always work). And often, FOSS are done by developers with smart algorithms and a lot of goodwill, but no idea of what is using the software when you need a result and you don't have time to spend understanding what every setting means.
It's great, though, to have free software, without having to pay a licence or to crack anything.

Have you worked for any FOSS project or contributed in some way?
I use some, but I don't code, I don't understand software enough to do a bug report… I sometimes talk about it to people.

How did you find out about Krita?
I discovered Krita through David Revoy and his work on Tears of Steel for the Blender Foundation.

What was your first take on it?
I got lost in the brushes settings.

What do you love about Krita?
It is a painting software where there is more than just brushes. I like all the transformation tools, the rulers, etc., they make it easy to correct a drawing without erasing (I have been taught that erasing is bad).

What do you think needs improvement in Krita? Also, anything that you really hate?
I don't know, really. I could say that it needs hierarchy: few presets (like brushes) easy to find/use and to use and all the fine settings if you need them or if you want to refine your use of it.

In your opinion, what sets Krita apart from the other tools that you use?
The transformation tools, and the grids are really cool on one hand and on the other, the complexity of all the brush settings and the huge number of blend modes I will likely never use.

If you had to pick one favorite of all your work done in Krita so far, what would it be?
I've uploaded to DeviantART my favorites (what I didn't delete so far – I delete a lot).

What is it that you like about the mouse? What brushes did you use in it?
I've tried to do what I did on paper: kraft paper, “pencil_HB” (which works well), “Pencil_2B” (that looks more like black chalk), a little watercolor and white gouache for the highlights (unfortunately, I can't find the watercolor tool, so I've used white “pencil_HB” instead – go figure).
Maybe I should try brush kits…

Thanks Coyau for this interview! Here you can see more of his art :)

Hi to all!

Here we are again with new products in the webshop. Now we have for you pillows, t-shirts, laptop sleeves... and more!
This time we had the collaboration of Tago Franceschi, Coyau and Nayobe Millis (our youngest artist), thanks to all of them to allow us to make great stuff with their artworks! You can see all the products on the Kritashop.

Here are some photos of the new products, enjoy it and share your love for Krita!

Cute tote bag by Nayobe Millis!
Cute tote bag by Nayobe Millis!

Only 5 months after we released Krita 2.6, we release Krita 2.7 today! There are a lot of cool new features, bug fixes and improvements. Soon to come to a Linux distribution near you.

The "highlights" of Krita 2.7:

  • Rewritten and hugely improved transform tool.
  • New line smoothing method for inking.
  • Greyscale masks and selections.kritaSmoothTest

But there are more improvements:

      • Brushes: the textured painting option has been added to many brushes, the darken brush option has a larger range, faster experimental brush engine with displacement option, the bug in the healing brush is fixed and we will have a smudge mode for the filter brush.
      • Filters: HSL and colorize options are now available in tje HSV filter,  one can apply a curve to the alpha channel with Color Curves filter, a new user interface for an improved " color to alpha" filter that makes it possible to pick colors from the canvas directly
      • Files: support for CMYK to PSD export filter, loading resolution for PSD images is fixed, it's now possible to importing a PSD image as a layer into an existing image, QML export (exports a all the top-level layers in the Krita image as image and creates a QML file where all the images are inserted as image objects) and drag & drop of url’s.
      • Texturing: Image offset tool (for creating seamless textures to Krita).

      • Tools: you can now finally type upper-case characters in the text tool, there are improvements to the move tool. The path tools are improved: the pencil tool integrates better with Krita, shapes can be stroked with a Krita brush, fix the transformation of path strokes.
      • Canvas: the performance of the OpenGL canvas on Linux has been improved. For Krita 2.8, OpenGL comes to Windows, too.
      • Docker: new composition docker (stack can be browsed with up and down arrow; the compositions can be exported in one go).
      • Layer: new file-backed layers, improved transforming of paint and vector layers, it's now possible to mirror all layers in an image.
      • Usability and interface:  improved zooming around cursor, two default workspaces (one for painting and one for working with vectors), now you can switch between favorite presets with left and right arrow keys and switch between current and previous shortcut with the / key, systems with multiple tablets and screens (for Cintiqs + classic tablet both connected to dual screen) now work fine, the display of marching ants around selection is improved, you can easily remove blacklisted resources from disk, you can select the most appropriate scale method, The Color button on the Krita toolbar opens the KDE color dialog which allows picking colors in other applications and selecting colors by numbers) and there's a menu action to select all opaque pixels in a layer -- check the right-click menu in the layerbox.

David Revoy has written an extensive Krita 2.7 guide with lots of screenshots and screencasts: http://www.davidrevoy.com/article178/krita-2-7-a-guide-through-the-new-features

Today we got a chance to interview Andreas Raninger, an IT-Technician from Sweden who paints for a hobby. Even though he is working full time, he finds out time for painting and even paint book covers! Awesome, right? Click on more to read the entire conversation, here is his work "Master and Apprentice".

Master and Apprentice

Hi Andreas, Would you like to tell us something about yourself?
I'm living in Sweden.I'm currently working as a IT-Technician in a company called IT-Hantverkarna. Painting in my free time.

So, you paint as a hobby artist then? In any case how would you define the importance of painting in your daily life?
I'm a hobby artist but sometimes I paint book covers. I paint every moment I get the chance but when I'm working full time I seldom have the time to sit down and paint for longer sessions.

When and how did you end up trying digital painting for the first time?
I have been painting digital since the Amiga days and Deluxe paint but was never serious about it. I bought my first drawing pad five years ago but I thought that I had more control using real paint and brushes. In late 2011 I bought a Wacom Intuos 4 L and was impressed by the precision and started to do more serious work. I discovered how comfortable it was to paint digitally. I haven't touched the oil colors after that.

An interesting look back! Now, what is it that makes you choose digital over the traditional painting?
First of all health and economy. No more thinners, dirty clothes and hands. I can work in a limited space and I don't have buy new materials all the time. I can change my compositions and try out new ideas all the time without repainting and worry about material costs and drying time.

How did you first find out about open source communities? What is your opinion about them?
I started with Linux in 1998 and been using different distributions since then. I never cared about communities because I have always been shy with people I can't see in front of me.

Have you worked for any FOSS project or contributed in some way?
No. Well, my main goal when uploading paintings done with Krita on Deviantart is to show others what can be done in Krita. I hope that I have contributed in that way somehow.

I think it certainly does count and it must have helped many artists new to Krita. Now, how did you find out about Krita?
I was looking for painting software that had serious tools and a humble support behind it. I changed OS to Linux and found out about Krita on the internet.

What was your first take on it?
I was pretty lost painting the first months because Krita has a lot of features. But that's no problem, there are really helpful tutorials out there written by other artists. At first Krita was painfully slow but that has improved dramatically.

Kudos to our brilliant team on this note!
So, what do you love about Krita?
First of all, the people behind Krita. I've never experienced any limitations in the software when it comes to techniques. It's all there and I can compile it with the newest code every day when I come home from work.

What do you think needs improvement in Krita? Also, anything that you really hate?
Memory efficiency is primary. Krita eats memory like crazy at a serious resolution. Adjustments should be instant like in Photoshop. When tweaking color and other things you tend to forget pretty fast how the last setting looked when you are waiting for an update of the new one.

In your opinion, what sets Krita apart from the other tools that you use?
No strange wizards and tools, it gets the job done the way I want it. You are the painter not the program. I can grow with it and it grows with me without pushing me into corners. Krita has a soft feeling that I can't explain. It's has more analog feeling to it than Photoshop that feels more digital.

Guess we’re on the right track in our efforts in that case!
Well, if you had to pick one favorite of all your work done in Krita so far, what would it be?
Unlimited.

Unlimited

What is it that you like about it? What brushes did you use in it?
I managed to catch the feeling and put it on screen in the way I wanted. Mostly basic brushes from the default set:
Basic Airbrush
Basic paint Shade
David Revoys Glow tool from the 2.1 brushset (Really good brushes)
And some Photohop brushes from Vincdesign that I converted to Krita.

Thank you very much Andreas for taking out time for this interview. I hope you had as much fun as I had interviewing you.
You can find more about Andreas on his deviant here.



Hi to all, today we have for you an interview with Nayobe Millis. She is a young girl from United States (she is only 16) who has collaborated with us in the webshop, giving us permissions to make merchandise with this cute artwork: Sheep's Pan Flute. She is our younger artist! thanks to her and enjoy the interview :)

napo_in_a_dress_by_nayobe-d5sqemk

Hi Nayobe, Do you paint professionally or as a hobby artist?
Right now I paint as a hobbyist, but I wish to improve my art skills so I can paint professionally.

When and how did you end up trying digital painting for the first time?
I remember it being years ago when I was a little kid in elementary school. I used to go on the computer and scribble on MS Paint using a laptop trackpad. I wanted to see if I could actually draw something on the computer like how I drew on paper.

What is it that makes you choose digital over the traditional painting? or Do you still prefer traditional means, if so, why?
I like both digital and traditional painting. It's easier painting digitally for me though, because you can really put in detail without worrying if you mess up. I haven't really painted much traditionally so I cannot compare that.

How did you first find out about open source communities? What is your opinion about them?
Well, I was always stuck with MS Paint, but then I learned about GIMP through DeviantArt. People who used it says GIMP is like Photoshop except it's free and I always heard how good Photoshop was, so I gave GIMP a shot. GIMP was the only open source community I heard about, I only learned about Krita through a DA user named TysonTan and I found other open source communities by watching speed paint on YouTube.-- yay! Tyson Tan is the artist who made our mascot!--

Have you worked for any FOSS project or contributed in some way?
I have not contributed to any FOSS projects for I had no clue what they were or if that even existed. I guess doing this for Krita will be my first.

What was your first take on it?
Woo, at first, I found Krita quite confusing to work with. I was just transferring over to it after using Paint Tool SAI so I had no clue how Krita worked. Took some time getting used to it. I'm still vague on it now, but I'm slowly starting to understand the way how it works. C:

What do you love about Krita?
The thing I love about Krita is the brushes and the way you can paint on it. There were so many brushes to experiment with. I personally like the square/rectangle brushes, it gives a painting effect. I also love how Krita keeps the color you used after you use them.

What do you think needs improvement in Krita? Also, anything that you really hate?
I can't really think of anything needing improvement. Maybe a curve tool that doesn't need you to connect back to point you started with in order for the line to be filled. There isn't anything I hate about Krita C:

In your opinion, what sets Krita apart from the other tools that you use?
I guess it would be the brush variety.

If you had to pick one favourite of all your work done in Krita so far, what would it be?
I barely did much pieces with Krita, but I gess it would be my most recent one Sheep's Pan Flute

__sheep_s_pan_flute___by_nayobe-d6cpppz

What is it that you like about it? What brushes did you use in it?
I like how I did the sky, grass, and the sheep itself. Sure it's not perfect, but I like painting messy. I used the default brush to sketch and ink and I used the "Block_Paint" brush for everything else, as well as using the "Basic_Airbrush" tool for the highlighting glow.

You can see her DeviantArt here. Thank you so much Nayobe and thanks for trust in Krita :)

This time we had a chance to interview Phillip Koops who paints for a hobby and swears by the words of Picasso - "Art washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life." An interesting conversation where he shares with us his views on Painting, Open Source Communities and much more. He also collaborated with us for the Krita Webshop and made us this uber-handsome Krita Bear!! Click on Read More to read the interview..

Krita BearHello Phillip, would you like to tell us something about yourself?
Sure, I'm over forty, married and father of two. I've always worked in a corporate environment (call-centre) and decided to have a shot at Freelancing because I thought it was my last opportunity to live the life I always dreamed of, and also because I would have more time for my family (working from home).

Do you paint professionally or as a hobby artist? In any of the case, how would you define the importance of painting in your daily life?

I paint as a hobby, and sometimes get paid for it. I think it always has to be a hobby, the minute it feels like it's a job - the fun goes away.

In daily life painting or any form of creation is very beneficial - I like what Picasso said :"Art washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life."

 

Well quoted, I must say!
When and how did you end up trying digital painting for the first time?

I studied oil painting as a teenager, and as soon as I could buy a tablet I was interested in painting digitally because of the comfort it gives.

 

What do you prefer, traditional or digital painting?

It really depends on the mood - I'd say if I have a solid idea and the energy I'll go for traditional painting because it conveys the best the moves and the emotions ; otherwise digital painting is like the clean and "easy" way of painting (but it might lack passion).

 

What made you return to traditional means of painting?

Drawing on a computer gives sometimes technical headaches, because of issues (slowness, crashes, bugs, updates ...) and it leads to frustration. Returning to simpler media was a way to put all this nonsense behind me and focus on my art. Just taking a piece of paper or canvas and drawing felt like returning to a simpler life.

 

How did you first find out about open source communities? What is your opinion about them?

I was introduced by a colleague at work to Linux (Debian) and found the idea of "open software" very liberating. I found a community that was very helpful and friendly and that felt very good.

 

Have you worked for any FOSS project or contributed in some way?

Nope, never had that chance.

 

How did you find out about Krita?

I think it was on Ramon Miranda's blog that I've first read about Krita and saw some really nice illustrations made with it. I was looking at all the software available on Linux - tried Gimp, myPaint and I thought, since I installed KDE I could try Krita.

 

What was your first take on it?

My first take wasn't very encouraging - I already had some automatism (shortcuts I used etc ...) so I felt a bit lost since the interface is quite different. Also, that's when I realized 1GB of ram isn't enough - Loading the "comics template" for example would crash my system -  I used Krita 2.4, so maybe some of what I remember isn't relevant anymore!

 

What do you love about Krita?

The right click with access to brushes, and colors;

features like symmetry;

the brushes engine ;

the templates offered.

 

What do you think needs improvement in Krita? Also, anything that you really hate?

This is difficult for me to answer this question because I haven't used Krita that long compared to other software.  So every issue I had are more likely to be caused by a lack of knowledge than an actual usability issue with Krita. But, I wish there was a "history of brushes" used - similar to the history of color

used ; this would be useful for me - because I have this tendency to jump from one brush to another.

 

We will get this wish on the bugs.kde list soon! Now, in your opinion, what sets Krita apart from the other tools that you use?

The brushes engine definitely.

 

If you had to pick one favorite of all your work done in Krita so far, what would it be?

Grumpy cat

Grumpy Cat

 

 

What is it that you like about it? What brushes did you use in it?

I made it long ago when grumpy cat wasn't really famous. I used a brush named "Texture_hair".

You can find the illustration here at my websitehttp://peileppe.com/search/grumpy . Thank you for this interview.

Thanks Philip for taking out time for this interview. And thanks for doing the Krita Bear for Krita Webshop. :)

 



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